What We’ve Been Up To

Crochet Donut

Now that it’s getting all Fall-ish, I’m thinking of getting back to yarn crafts. If you need a sweet handmade something for a little person, I highly recommend this. A simple and satisfying beginner project. Wrap it up in parchment paper and tie with baker’s twine for additional themey cuteness. These would also be super… Read more »

Baby + Kid, The Season of Cozy, Toy, Yarn

One Frame Three Ways

Buttery yellow with wallpaper in my daughter’s room Vintage turquoise as a chalkboard via Little Green Notebook White as a display sign for Cuppielove via Yes, Please Before & After pics and where to get it after the jump… Before & After Prudent Price: Frame $24.99 at Ikea Julia Rothman Daydream wallpaper remnant $0 (or… Read more »

Baby + Kid, Bath, Bed, Decor, Nursery, Prudent Home, Tips + Tricks

DIY: Easy Drawstring Bag

Perfect as a re-usable gift wrap, themed to tote party favors, or as storage for wayward blocks, this super-simple drawstring bag DIY from favorite site Purl Bee is a satisfying project to whip out after the kids go to bed:   Etsuka Furuya Echino home-decor weight fabric in yellow $16.95 per yard at superbuzzy… …and in… Read more »

Accessories, Baby + Kid, By Craft, Sewing & Serging

Freshening the Bed

Jenny over at DOS family took a used find from a swedish craiglist-type site and created this adorable bed for her son in just a few steps. Visit her site to check out the before and after pics. by Jaime

Baby + Kid, Bed, By Craft, Decoupage, Furniture

DIY: Modern Mobile

Kelly over at Yes, Please posted a great DIY Mobile whipped up by our friend, Babble columnist and Pump Station teacher Heather Turgeon, for her little guy. Click on over to get the how-to. by Jaime

Baby + Kid, Bed, By Craft, Nursery, Paper, Toy

Crochet Donut



Now that it’s getting all Fall-ish, I’m thinking of getting back to yarn crafts. If you need a sweet handmade something for a little person, I highly recommend this. A simple and satisfying beginner project. Wrap it up in parchment paper and tie with baker’s twine for additional themey cuteness. These would also be super cute in multiples if you’re feeling ambitious. The pattern is free, courtesy of KTBDesigns.

PS. I sewed a few jingle Bells inside before closing mine up.

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One Frame Three Ways

Buttery yellow with wallpaper in my daughter’s room

Vintage turquoise as a chalkboard via Little Green Notebook

White as a display sign for Cuppielove via Yes, Please

Before & After pics and where to get it after the jump…


Before & After

Prudent Price:

Frame $24.99 at Ikea

Julia Rothman Daydream wallpaper remnant $0 (or $20/yard at Hygge & West

One can Rust Oleum Painter’s Touch in Satin Summer Squash $7.33 on Amazon or at Home Depot

Total $32.32

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DIY: Easy Drawstring Bag

Perfect as a re-usable gift wrap, themed to tote party favors, or as storage for wayward blocks, this super-simple drawstring bag DIY from favorite site Purl Bee is a satisfying project to whip out after the kids go to bed:  

Etsuka Furuya Echino home-decor weight fabric in yellow $16.95 per yard at superbuzzy

…and in pink and a variety of other patterns and colors for $19.50 a yard right at Purl Soho

I made mine with leftover scraps of decor-weight fabric and ribbon I had on hand, but how cute would it be with thick rick-rack or this Matryoshka Ribbon from Reprodepot?

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DIY: Boy Tee into Girl Dress

BEFORE:

AFTER:

The husband, baby and I headed back to Nashville last week to visit our amazing new niece.  We had to stop by Jack White’s Third Man Records shop where we picked up this toddler tee that was far too large for our girl.  I thought I’d try to make it into a dress. I’m a beginning sewer and have never worked with jersey before, so this is a super simple project that took about an hour; I think it turned out pretty cute in a rocker kind of way.  Check out the DIY after the jump…


1.  Start by turning the tee inside out and cutting the sleeves and neckline off, then iron it flat:

2.  Draw a straight line from the top corner to the bottom corner (just inside the seam on the hem of the tee) with a washable marker:

3.  Sew a straight stitch along that line on either side with thread that matches your tee:

4.  Cut the excess fabric off.  You can finish your new seam if you know how to do it without a serger, but i don’t.

5.  Fold the top edge down, iron and pin in place, then hem with a straight stitch:

Now you’ve got a stretchy little tube dress.

6. I needed to make straps but i didn’t have enough excess fabric, so I deliberated and came upon this solution.  Take the discarded sleeves of the old tee:

Cut the hems off:

Cut each hem so that it is open on both sides like a tube so you can loop turn it.  I have a loop turner but I haven’t mastered it, so I use a safety pin.  To do this, attach the pin to one end of the hem:

Turn it around and push it back through the fabric and out the other side.  The fabric will bunch up; just gently help it along until it gives and your tube turns right-side out.  Repeat on the other hem, then iron them flat with the seam in the middle so you can only see it on one side. Here is one mid-turn and one already turned:

7.  Pin your straps to the dress after trying it on your model child (there are no pictures of me trying it on her because i didn’t – lesson learned, see below). Sew the four strap ends in place along the first seam you made and again right above that at the top of the dress for extra strength.

Now you’ve got a tank dress:

I thought I was done until I tested it out on my model:

Too big, the straps wouldn’t stay up:

8.  So I repeated the loop turning process used to make the straps, but this time I used a bit of the neckline from the old tee.  I wrapped the new piece of strap around the two straps, turned it inside out and sewed it together, then flipped it back over to create this little doodad:

Done!  And when she gets a little bigger, I can snip the doodad off and it will magically be a tank dress again.  If there is a name for this doodad please let me know.  It seems like everything in sewing has some crazy name I’ve never heard before.  Anyway, look how cute:

Might need some leggings, boots and a leather jacket for winter, right?

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Prettier Formula

I saw this post over at OhDeeDoh and I finally knew what to do with this Jonathan Adler container I picked up for $7 at Homegoods a while back:  Ditch the ugly tub and store powdered formula in it.  It feels good to make a cute container useful, no?  Here’s a few I dug up:

Ceramic Bisque Cupcake Jar $18.00 from dmkarlik Ceramics ebay shop

Parasol Bone jar by Roost, $49.95 at Well Dressed Home

Wood Grain Box by Micheal Aram for Waterford $95 at Macy’s 

Vintage Greyhound canister $19.50 on etsy

Vintage Ceramic Tea Set $43.00 for 5 pieces at jwhite2

Bluebird and Trees Canister $26 at Three Potato Four

Ceramic Owl Jar $49.99 at JC Penney

Ceramic bird canister $19.99 at Target

Chalk Talk Storage $6.99 at World Market

Or grab a few great fabric scraps and follow this step-by-step DIY from Jackie at Crafting A Green World to customize a plain container.

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DIY: Pom Pom Curtains!

I came across these pom pom window panels from Pine Cone Hill while browsing through House Beautiful on a plane recently. They’re so girly without being frilly – perfect for my daughter’s room:

I fell in love with them instantly, but with two windows to cover I couldn’t shell out the $250 for something that seemed simple enough to make on my own. So that’s what I did:

Get the DIY after the jump…

I started by walking around the corner to the Linen Outlet “tent sale” (it’s been going on for at least five years) to see if I could find some voile panels to simply attach the pom pom trim too, but with the dramatic height I wanted to give the windows, the pre-made panels weren’t long enough. I just wanted to sew those curtains RIGHT THEN before Scarlet woke up and another curtainless weekend came to a close, so I started rummaging and scheming and happened upon this:

This swag was the perfect length to be chopped in half and it already had a hemmed edge – just perfect – so I picked up two. I had already hit up trusty Joanne Fabric for my pom pom trim; they had about nine colors to choose from, but I’m going for a yellow-gray-magenta look and the pink they offered was too pale for my tastes. I bought the whole roll (imagining future pillows and tea-towels) at only $2.99 a yard – but I see now it’s even cheaper from their online store:

So here’s the step by step on actually getting these babies made:

1. Chop the swag(s) in half. You should have two pieces, each of which now as three hemmed sides and one cut side. So that’s the side we will sew into a rod pocket.

2. Measure and cut. Figure the length you want the curtains to be from rod to floor and add 3 inches, then cut your fabric pieces down along the same cut side. I think the pom poms look best just skimming the floor:

3. Time to iron. A bit tedious but must be done. Fold the cut side over one inch and iron, then fold it over again 2 inches and iron, then pin the fold in place. Don’t stress about getting it just perfect – these are pom pom curtains, if they are a teensy bit uneven no one is going to know. Repeat on the other piece.

4. Get your thread ready. With this being my first shot at sewing a sheer fabric, I thought I would give invisible thread a try just to avoid any messy seams showing up on my voile. So I took out my fresh new spool and created a bobbin using my bobbin winder. Turns out you can’t do that, it makes your sewing machine angry; this is what happens:

So you can either hand wind your bobbin with invisible thread, or if you are too lazy for that like me, you can use a bobbin of white thread and your spool of invisible thread so your stitches are white on the back of the curtain and invisible on top. That’s what I did and you’d never know – totally can’t see it.

5. Sew time! Just use your basic straight stitch across the bottom of the seam you made. If the voile pulls a little here and there it’s okay, you can iron it out. Repeat on the other panel and you have your rod pockets.

6. Add the trim. I sewed the poms poms to the inside and bottom of each panel, just leaving the trim on the roll and feeding it through the machine on top of the fabric – didn’t even pin it first. Make sure the trim is on the right side of the fabric and the trim is on top as you’re feeding it through your machine. With the invisible thread you really don’t have to worry about sewing a perfectly straight line, even in close-up you can’t see it:

At the corners just remember to leave your needle in the fabric, lift the presser foot, and sew the trim into a nice corner, you may have to do it twice at each corner to get a good angle. And remember not to sew your rod pocket closed with the trim. When you get about half an inch from the ends stop sewing, cut the pom pom trim off just far enough to reach the rod pocket and fold it under and seal it with a few stitches across the top.

Iron ’em and you’re done!

Prudent Price for 4 Pom Pom Panels:
store: $256 plus shipping.
DIY:swags $39.98 + pom pom trim: $44.85 + invisible thread $1.69 = $86.52

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